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Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Best Thing I've Read Today

Last week, I wrote a critique of Robert Reich's critique of Bernie Sanders skeptics. One of his points (that I debunked) is to quote polls that say Sanders will beat any Republican candidate in the general election by even larger margins than Hillary Clinton would. As I pointed out, polls in April aren't very valid in predicting what will happen in November, especially since the GOP attack machine has yet to aim its guns at Sanders.

Paul Waldman agrees:

So let's consider the kinds of attacks Sanders would face from Republicans. They wouldn't just call him a socialist — in fact, that'd be about the nicest thing they'd say about him. They'd say he's coming to raise your taxes to fund big-government schemes. They'd say he wants to cripple the military. They'd say he's advocated eliminating our intelligence capabilities. They'd say he was part of a Trotskyite party that expressed "solidarity" with the theocratic government of Iran while it was holding Americans hostage. They'd say he wants government to seize the means of production. They'd say he hates America. They'd say he's the author of smutty rape fantasies.

These attacks would be unfair, exaggerated, distorted, dishonest — and when Sanders protests, the Republicans would laugh and keep making them. By the time they're done with him, most Americans would think Sanders is so radical and dangerous that they wouldn't want him running their local food co-op, let alone the United States government.

Sanders supporters tend to wave away the possibility that these attacks would hurt him in much the same way the candidate himself dispenses with questions of practicality, by saying that his revolution will be so extraordinary that it will sweep all opposition away. Millions of heretofore absent voters will turn up at the polls, Americans will see the wisdom of his ideas, this election will be different than any that came before! But there's little reason to believe that will happen, particularly when even within the Democratic Party, Sanders hasn't been persuasive enough to overcome Hillary Clinton, who is supposed to be so weak.
Read Waldman's full piece here.